Thank Goddess For Garlic

where it all begins

I love garlic. I’d eat a garlic sandwich if it weren’t for the inevitable “death breath” that garlic has habit of creating. As you can tell by looking at it, it is a bulb and therefore can be planted in the fall along with all of your other bulbs. Only with garlic, a single clove sort of acts as a seed rendering an entire bulb after maturation. This makes sense when you think about the garlic you’ve left unused for weeks and it starts to sprout a little pale green shoot. Now if you didn’t plan ahead (ahem) that’s okay too. Early spring plantings are just as good and you can yield a comparable harvest. The key is to sort of trick your garlic into thinking it’s in a dormant state by sticking it your fridge. And since I’ve never done this before i’ll have to roll the dice on the length it needs to be in there in order to be fooled. I’m guessing a week. Once your garlic is sufficiently sleepy break it up into single cloves.  A general rule about planting bulbs is to dig a hole double the size of the bulb. So with each clove i suggest planting about 2 inches deep and 4 inches apart with the fat part of the clove facing down. If you’re fortunate enough to have the space to do rows make sure they’re a foot apart. I’d say the trickiest part of growing garlic is the harvest itself.  You know it’s ready to go when the leaves start to brown and die off.  I suppose it’s better to err on the side of harvesting too soon where the cloves will be very small (and the skins tender and edible as well) rather than too late where the bulb will split apart. Now don’t forget garlic needs to be dried. Otherwise it will rot and then all your work for naught. Despite your desire to manhandle your produce after all that waiting, don’t mess with them too much and certainly don’t wash them off. Just hang them up in a cool, dry place and after about a week you can wipe off the dirt and reap your rewards.

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