Truck Farm!

a truck farm

This truck is always parked in my neighborhood. I tried to go to the website but it was blacked out so I just googled the words “wicked delicate”. I guess they’re a Brooklyn-based production company and there are a few shorts on youtube about the truck farm itself. Check it out. http://www.youtube.com/user/wickedelicate

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Say It Ain’t So

As it turns out, that big ole tree in my new backyard is, well, dead. So there goes the shaded garden. Now I will be plagued with bird crap and broken branches all the live long day. Not to mention the threat of the thing falling over into my bedroom. Sigh. In other news, here’s some new pics of the ever-developing garden.

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tweeting?

ok… i don’t mean the birds, though it is spring and while visiting NC there was an abundance of birds out and about. i’ve created a mini slideshow of my road trip to NC with a stop by LA Reynolds Garden Center, The Greensboro Farmers Market & Mama Quade’s house where I have been spoiled with warm temps and beautiful spring blooms!

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now back to the birds… did you know we’re tweeting??

follow us @3girlsandagrdn  see you around the twitterverse…

Shady Business

Here in Brooklyn I’ve been spoiled for the last three years with my south facing, relatively unencumbered, sunny garden. I’ve easily been able to grow vegetables and herbs and even an occasional fruit. But now, settled in the new place I realize there is a monster of a tree that will eventually blanket my yard with shade.  Some typical shade-loving perennials are hosta, ferns, brunia, hellebore, heuchera and hydrangea just to name a few. They are all pretty hardy and should come back each year depending on variety although i’ve found some ferns can’t take the cold winters up here and never rear their fronds again.  You should choose some shrubs and perennials for depth and texture and then add annuals for color and tone. Here are some great annuals for shade: Impatiens which will fare well all season long. Coleus which comes in so many amazingly colorful varieties nowadays. The Polka-dot plant is just plain cool and gets pretty tall.  Ipomea aka sweet potato vine is perfect for container plantings. Lobelia is a cute and delicate flower that is great for borders. And of course the ever-classic pansy or it’s little sister, viola, can be used to fill a window box.

I admit I planned on documenting the transplant of some of my old plants to the new apartment but I was so distracted and busy by the move I shirked my duties. Mea culpa. Here are some pictures of the current garden. A few are new additions but mostly old pals I couldn’t bear to part with.  It’s no where near complete but it is only April so there’s still time. On a side note, my computer display is broken so I don’t really know how this final draft is going to look. Here’s to hoping!

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fresh eggs.

the other day i came home & a friend handed me a couple of fresh eggs from the farm upstate… there is just something about eggs from chickens that were not bought in some store.

this past fall i learned that if the eggs that are laid are unwashed they do not need to be refrigerated as the icky looking coating protects the egg.. it is only when that is washed off ( like the super clean eggs you find in a store ) that the egg will spoil if left unrefrigerated… so stop washing those freshly laid eggs!

here’s a bit about ”unwashed eggs” from the site ‘seeds of nutrition’ :

You want to be sure that the “Bloom” is left on. What is the “Bloom”? It is a natural antibacterial protective covering that the hen deposits on the egg as she is laying it.
That protective coating protects the egg until it is used. Bacteria has a hard time penetrating a dry shell, but will have a much easier time if the shell is wet because the shell is porous.

Commercially grown eggs are washed and bleached. Not only that; the chickens are cage confined and never see the day of light. And because of these conditions their feed is loaded with antibiotics to keep the chicken healthy. These chickens also have a very short life span.

“Unwashed Eggs” are eggs that are gathered, brought into the house and lightly wiped off with a dry cloth, paper towel, a loofa pad, or scrubby. Absolutely no water comes in contact. If the hens laying box is kept clean and egg gathering is frequent for the most part the eggs will be clean and no need to deal with feathers, hay stuck on, or chicken poop.

Thank Goddess For Garlic

where it all begins

I love garlic. I’d eat a garlic sandwich if it weren’t for the inevitable “death breath” that garlic has habit of creating. As you can tell by looking at it, it is a bulb and therefore can be planted in the fall along with all of your other bulbs. Only with garlic, a single clove sort of acts as a seed rendering an entire bulb after maturation. This makes sense when you think about the garlic you’ve left unused for weeks and it starts to sprout a little pale green shoot. Now if you didn’t plan ahead (ahem) that’s okay too. Early spring plantings are just as good and you can yield a comparable harvest. The key is to sort of trick your garlic into thinking it’s in a dormant state by sticking it your fridge. And since I’ve never done this before i’ll have to roll the dice on the length it needs to be in there in order to be fooled. I’m guessing a week. Once your garlic is sufficiently sleepy break it up into single cloves.  A general rule about planting bulbs is to dig a hole double the size of the bulb. So with each clove i suggest planting about 2 inches deep and 4 inches apart with the fat part of the clove facing down. If you’re fortunate enough to have the space to do rows make sure they’re a foot apart. I’d say the trickiest part of growing garlic is the harvest itself.  You know it’s ready to go when the leaves start to brown and die off.  I suppose it’s better to err on the side of harvesting too soon where the cloves will be very small (and the skins tender and edible as well) rather than too late where the bulb will split apart. Now don’t forget garlic needs to be dried. Otherwise it will rot and then all your work for naught. Despite your desire to manhandle your produce after all that waiting, don’t mess with them too much and certainly don’t wash them off. Just hang them up in a cool, dry place and after about a week you can wipe off the dirt and reap your rewards.