Say It Ain’t So

As it turns out, that big ole tree in my new backyard is, well, dead. So there goes the shaded garden. Now I will be plagued with bird crap and broken branches all the live long day. Not to mention the threat of the thing falling over into my bedroom. Sigh. In other news, here’s some new pics of the ever-developing garden.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Shady Business

Here in Brooklyn I’ve been spoiled for the last three years with my south facing, relatively unencumbered, sunny garden. I’ve easily been able to grow vegetables and herbs and even an occasional fruit. But now, settled in the new place I realize there is a monster of a tree that will eventually blanket my yard with shade.  Some typical shade-loving perennials are hosta, ferns, brunia, hellebore, heuchera and hydrangea just to name a few. They are all pretty hardy and should come back each year depending on variety although i’ve found some ferns can’t take the cold winters up here and never rear their fronds again.  You should choose some shrubs and perennials for depth and texture and then add annuals for color and tone. Here are some great annuals for shade: Impatiens which will fare well all season long. Coleus which comes in so many amazingly colorful varieties nowadays. The Polka-dot plant is just plain cool and gets pretty tall.  Ipomea aka sweet potato vine is perfect for container plantings. Lobelia is a cute and delicate flower that is great for borders. And of course the ever-classic pansy or it’s little sister, viola, can be used to fill a window box.

I admit I planned on documenting the transplant of some of my old plants to the new apartment but I was so distracted and busy by the move I shirked my duties. Mea culpa. Here are some pictures of the current garden. A few are new additions but mostly old pals I couldn’t bear to part with.  It’s no where near complete but it is only April so there’s still time. On a side note, my computer display is broken so I don’t really know how this final draft is going to look. Here’s to hoping!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

fresh eggs.

the other day i came home & a friend handed me a couple of fresh eggs from the farm upstate… there is just something about eggs from chickens that were not bought in some store.

this past fall i learned that if the eggs that are laid are unwashed they do not need to be refrigerated as the icky looking coating protects the egg.. it is only when that is washed off ( like the super clean eggs you find in a store ) that the egg will spoil if left unrefrigerated… so stop washing those freshly laid eggs!

here’s a bit about ”unwashed eggs” from the site ‘seeds of nutrition’ :

You want to be sure that the “Bloom” is left on. What is the “Bloom”? It is a natural antibacterial protective covering that the hen deposits on the egg as she is laying it.
That protective coating protects the egg until it is used. Bacteria has a hard time penetrating a dry shell, but will have a much easier time if the shell is wet because the shell is porous.

Commercially grown eggs are washed and bleached. Not only that; the chickens are cage confined and never see the day of light. And because of these conditions their feed is loaded with antibiotics to keep the chicken healthy. These chickens also have a very short life span.

“Unwashed Eggs” are eggs that are gathered, brought into the house and lightly wiped off with a dry cloth, paper towel, a loofa pad, or scrubby. Absolutely no water comes in contact. If the hens laying box is kept clean and egg gathering is frequent for the most part the eggs will be clean and no need to deal with feathers, hay stuck on, or chicken poop.